Credit Opportunities Archive

4/25/15 - 4/25/15 - Vernal Pool Identification & Ecology, Norfolk, CT

Aton Forest
270 North Colebrook Road
Norfolk, CT 06058

 

Saturday, April 25, 2015
9:00am - 1:00pm

 

 

This workshop will give participants the knowledge to identify our local amphibians as adults, larvae, and eggs in the field and in the classroom.  Identification of these animals will be based on physical characteristics as well as by calls.  Instruction on how to locate and identify vernal pools and collect data for inventories and monitoring will also be covered.

The workshop will consist of an introductory classroom session followed by a trip into the field to observe some vernal pools at Aton Forest.  This workshop is designed for people who are interested in amphibians and vernal pool protection, especially those interested in conducting inventories and monitoring vernal pools.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

 

4/23/15 - DEVELOPING AN INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM, Milford, MA

Doubletree Hotel 11 Beaver St 
MilfordMA 01757 

 

April, 23, 2015

9:00AM to 2:30PM

 

Develop and implement an invasive plant management program, including management tips and strategies, herbicide selection and timing, non-chemical strategies, and ways to avoid common program pitfalls.

Part B of UMass Extension's Invasive Plant Management Certification.

 

Details & Registration

4 AOLCP CEUs

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

4/18/15 - Make Room for Mushrooms, PA

Longwood Gardens 1001 Longwood Road
Kennett Square, PA 19348

Saturday, April 18, 2015

1pm to 4pm

 

$55.00 ($49.00 for Longwood Gardens Members)
Discover the emerging field of mycotechnology—using mushrooms to clean up and regenerate toxic and degraded landscapes. Find out about your own DIY cultivation options including log culture, wood chip beds, and other, more creative, mushroom growing techniques. Part of the class time will be spent making your own mushroom bag—a simple and easy way to grow and enjoy your own edible mushrooms anywhere!
AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop
3 AOLCP Credits
4/11/15 - Gardening for Beginners Day, Mt. Cuba Center, DE

3120 Barley Mill Rd

Hockessin, DE 19707

 

Saturday, April 11, 2015

$15 per session or $35 for all three

Intro to Eco-Gardening: 9:30am - 10:30am

Plant This: 10:45am - 11:45am

Down & Dirty: Soil Basics: 12:30pm - 1:30pm

 

Details and Registration

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

1 AOLCP CEU each or 4 AOLCP CEUs for all three

4/2/15 - THE INVASIVE PLANT ISSUE AND INVASIVE PLANT IDENTIFICATION, MA

Doubletree Hotel 11 Beaver St
Milford, MA 01757

 

Thursday, April 2, 2015

9am to 2pm

 

Why should you be concerned? Enhance your ability to readily identify invasive plants as well as their look-alikes. Discussion of the strategies and recommendations of the Massachusetts Invasive Plant Advisory Group, and the recently released Early Detection/Rapid Response Priority List document.

Part A3 of UMass Extension's Invasive Plant Management Certification.

 

Details and Registration

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

4 AOLCP Credits

4/1/15 - 4/1/2015 - Distinguishing Invasive Plants & Native Look-Alikes in Late Winter & Early Spring, Norfolk, CT

Aton Forest
270 North Colebrook Road
Norfolk, CT 06058

 

Wednesday, April 1, 2015
8:30am to 5:00pm

 

Come learn to identify woody invasive plants in the field!  Late winter/early spring is  prime season to touch up on your skills and get a jump on these pesky plants.  This time of year is ideal for management but identification can be tricky.  With the help of consulting field botanist Bill Moorhead you will learn to identify invasive woody plants in both terrestrial and wetland ecosystems, and distinguish them from those native plants with which they may be confused.


A brief introductory classroom session will be followed by visits to a number of field sites.  In the event of weather too severe for field work, the workshop may be changed into a lab/classroom session using fresh collected specimens.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

3/31/15 - New England Wildflower Society 2015 Events, MA

The New England Wildflower Society  has released their 2015 schedule of workshops and courses.

February through December

View  programs  here

Various AOLCP CEUs

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

3/29/15 - NOFA Rhode Island Winter Conference, Warren, RI

Hope & Main 691 Main Street 
WarrenRI 02885 

Sunday, March 29, 2015

8:30AM TO 4:30PM

 

Details & Registration

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

4 AOLCP CEUs

3/26/15 - Pollinator Health for Agriculture and Landscapes, MA

Campus Center - 1 Campus Center Way University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003

Thursday, March 26, 2015

8:45 AM Welcome, Anne Averill, Dept. of Environmental Conservation, UMass

9:00 – 10:00 AM Biology, Diversity and Conservation of Native Bees in the Northeast -
Joan Milam, UMass Dept. of Environmental Conservation
Pollinators are key elements of native biodiversity, and bees in particular provide important ecosystem services in terms of pollination for native plants that support plant and wildlife diversity. Not only are bees important pollinators of natural systems, they are responsible for the pollination of the fruits, nuts and vegetables grown in the United States. This talk will cover bee basics: what makes a bee a bee, the great diversity of bee species, and what we can do to help conserve native bees.

10:00 – 10:45 AM The Natural History and Ecology of Honey bees in Our Landscapes - Dr. Frank Drummond, School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine
Honey bees are amazing animals. They are one of the few insects that have been domesticated by humans, but they still remain somewhat wild. This talk discusses the first introductions of honey bees to the New World, their importance to the Early Europeans and their place in the ecology of the New World. Dr. Drummond will then take a very quick look at the history of honey bees in the U.S. up to the 1960s and then how changes occurred through the present that have determined the current honey bee status and health.

10:45 – 11:00 AM Break

11:00 – 11:45 AM How Healthy are the Bees? - Dr. Frank Drummond, School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine
We have all heard about CCD, colony collapse, bee decline, a new silent spring...so, the question is how is the honey bee doing AND also the hundreds of species that are referred to as native bees? Dr. Drummond will discuss bee health...what is meant by "health"...what do scientists know about bee "health" and what is the global picture that is beginning to form about bee health. Dr. Drummond will attempt to provide background knowledge for better understanding several of the other talks in this conference about what we can DO about bee declines.

11:45 – 1:00 Lunch

1:00 – 2:00 Designing Pollinator Support Plantings: Think Like a Bee - Dr. Lois Berg Stack, University of Maine, Northern New England Pollinator Habitat Working Group
Lois will help us to think like a bee when designing pollinator support plantings. Effective pollinator support plantings provide flower resources, nest sites and water. Good site assessment allows for the selection of plants that complement existing resources, and good process can produce an effective long-term resource that requires limited maintenance.

2:00 – 2:10 Break

2:10 – 3:00 PM Neonicotinoids in Agriculture and Landscapes: Do They Harm Honey Bees or Native Bees? - Dr. Kim Stoner, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
For 10 years, controversy has been swirling around the possible effects of neonicotinoids on bees. Dr. Stoner will talk about what we have learned and what we still don’t know about routes by which bees could be exposed to these systemic insecticides and how bee health may be affected.

3:00 – 4:00 PM Creating a Bee-friendly Landscape: Protecting Bees from Pesticide Exposure - Dr. Anne Averill, Department of Environmental Conservation, UMass
In addition to the neonicotinoids, what are the different classes of pesticides, what are their risks to pollinators, how do they interact with other stressors, and how can pollinators be protected from exposure? Guidelines on how to best manage pests while reducing the hazard to bees will be covered. She will conclude with a broad look of how national and international programs address pollinator health and safety.


Details and Registration

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

4 AOLCP credits

3/25/15 - Organic Pest Management, Framingham, MA

New England Wild Flower Society

 

Garden in the Woods
180 Hemenway Road
Framingham, MA01701

 

Wednesday, March 25, 2015
6:00pm to 9:00pm

 

Too often, a gardener’s response to insect pests or diseases is eradication, when all that’s really necessary is a little patience. Native plant gardens contribute to local ecosystems in myriad ways, but we limit their value when we apply pesticides. Learn how the horticulturists at Garden in the Woods use organic practices to manage plant health care in the Garden and how you can do the same at home.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

3 AOLCP credits