Credit Opportunities

7/24/14 - Down to Earth Summer Conference & Trade Show, Deerfield, MA

Massachusetts Nursery & Landscape Association (MNLA) & Mass Flower Growers Association

 

Savage Farms
128 Lower Road
Deerfield, MA

 

Thursday, July 24, 2014
8:00am to 5:00pm

 

Our Keynote Presentation…“The Future in Plant Materials” by Michael Dirr
Our featured Keynote speaker is the author of seven books, including Manual of Woody Landscape Plants: Their Identification, Ornamental Characteristics, Culture and Propagation and Uses, a widely used and best-selling reference text.

Take advantage of the newest ideas and cutting edge information and education to put you ahead of your competition. Pesticide credits, speed educational sessions and tours are only a few of this years’ exciting program.

Sponsored by The Massachusetts Nursery and Landscape Association and the Massachusetts Flower Growers Association

 

Details and registration

 

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

 

7/25/14 - Natural Communities of Maine, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Friday, July 25, 2014 & Saturday, July 26, 2014
10:00am to 4:00pm, both days

 

A truly comprehensive understanding of native plant materials must necessarily include an understanding of how native plants behave in their natural habitats.  In Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens’ two-day introduction to the natural communities of Maine on Friday and Saturday, July 25 and 26, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. each day, ecologist Ted Elliman will introduce students to several of Maine’s characteristic assemblages of plants, their defining physical environments, and the natural processes that affect them.  In the classroom and in the field, students will learn the differences between community types such as salt marshes, red maple swamps, northern hardwood forests, bogs, and floodplain forests.  Ted will also cover some of the common plants that occur in each natural community type, and what plant adaptations are a key to competing successfully in the various communities. 

The primary reference for this course will be Natural Landscapes of Maine: a Guide to Natural Communities and Ecosystems by Susan Gawler and Andrew Cutko. Bring a lunch, sturdy shoes that can get wet, and your sense of adventure for this not-to-be missed learning experience.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credtis

 

7/25/14 - Tree Tour at UMass Amherst, Amherst, MA

UMass Amherst
Stockbridge Hall
Amherst, MA 01003

 

Friday, July 25, 2014
8:30am to 11:00am

 

 

For most people who work with trees, Michael Dirr needs no introduction. He is the author of numerous books on woody plants that have become staples on our desks, including his most celebrated The Manual of Woody Plants, Dirr’s Hardy Trees and Shrubs, Hydrangeas for American Gardens, and Viburnums: Flowering Shrubs for Every Season. We can proudly state he has UMass roots, as he earned his PhD with UMass in Plant and Soil Sciences.  His fingers are always on the pulse of the nursery industry, scouting for new introductions and he has himself introduced 15 trees into the nursery trade. He has established several arboreta, consults on tree selections and has penned tree guides for many campuses.  The green industry has benefited tremendously from his keen interest in evaluating trees and his enthusiasm to share it with us.

Join Dr. Dirr on a tree tour of the UMass Amherst campus and interact with him as he shows off the select trees of the campus’ Waugh Arboretum.  Preregistration required. Dress for the weather - the tour goes on rain or shine

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

2 AOLCP credits

 

7/29/14 - Identification of Turf-Damaging Diseases, Amherst, MA

UMass Amherst Turf Program

 

UMass Amherst Campus Center
University of Massachusetts
1 Campus Center Way
Amherst, MA 01003

 

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
9:00am to 2:00pm

 

Accurate identification of turf-damaging pests is the first step toward effective, integrated management. Knowing the target pest is key to understanding the biology and life cycle, determining threshold levels for damage, and making informed and responsible control decisions. UMass Turf Pathologist Geunhwa Jung will lead this session focusing on the identification of turf disease pathogens common in the Northeast. Diseases covered will include patch diseases, root diseases, stress diseases, dollar spot, snow molds, anthracnose, red thread and rusts. Lecture material will be coupled with examination of turf in the field, and IPM considerations and resistance management will be highlighted.

 

Agenda

8:30-9:00

Attendee check-in

9:00-12:00

Turfgrass disease identification lecture and discussion, including microscopic identification (3 pesticide contact hours requested)

12:00-1:00

Lunch (provided for full-program registrants) and travel to UMass Joseph Troll Turf Research Center in South Deerfield, MA

1:00-2:00

Turfgrass identification field session at UMass Joseph Troll Turf Research Center (1 pesticide contact hour requested)

Registration

Two registration options are available for this program. Attendees may choose between:

  • Full-program option ($95): Registration for the full program including morning lecture, lunch and afternoon field session at the UMass Joseph Troll Turf Research Center in South Deerfield.
  • Lecture-only option ($75): Registration for the 9:00-12:00 lecture session only, does not include lunch or afternoon session.

All registrations include a parking permit (one permit per carpool). Online registrations are subject to an additional processing fee.

 

Details and registration

 

 AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits for full day   /  3 AOLCP credits for lecture-only option

7/31/14 - Biological Controls: Putting it All Together for Success, Vernon, CT

Tolland County Extension Center
24 Hyde Avenue (Route 30)
Vernon, CT

 

Thursday, July 31, 2014
8:00am to 3:30pm

 

For greenhouse ornamentals and greenhouse vegetables.  Topics include:

  • Growing Greenhouse Plants with Water-Soluble Organic Fertilzers
  • Greenhouse Pest Control: A Systems Approach
  • Innovations in Greenhouse Pest Management
  • A "Softer" Approach to Managing Diseases in the Greenhouse
  • Biocontrol Programs in Greenhouse Vegetable Crops

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

7/31/14 - Landscape Plants: Grasses, Brooklyn, NY

The New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Boulevard
Bronx, NY 10458-5126

 

Thursday, July 31, 2014
2:00pm to 4:15pm OR 6:15pm to 8:30pm

 

Add depth and texture to the landscape with the careful selection and use of a variety of ornamental grasses. Be amazed by the wealth of opportunities to create height in the border from as little as 6 inches to 12 feet and more. Learn about design elements in the planning cycle, planting techniques, and long-term maintenance. Methods of managing pests, diseases, and weeds are discussed.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

2 AOLCP credits

8/1/14 - Green Roof Tour, Federal Reserve Bank, Boston, MA

Federal Reserve Bank
600 Atlantic Ave #100
Boston, MA 02210

 

Friday, August 1, 2014
11:00am to 12:30pm

 

The 18,000 square foot roof garden at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston was installed in 1976 and is considered one of the oldest, still original roof gardens in the country. It was designed by Robert Fager, ASLA, who worked for the building architect, Hugh Stubbins and Associates. Frank W. Sellner was the landscape architect consultant for the project. He often told stories of interning for Beatrix Farrand and his work experience with Fletcher Steele!

 

The garden is on the fourth floor, 90’ above the ground floor with sweeping views toward Boston Harbor and the Seaport District. The garden is accessed through the fourth floor café and function rooms with large floor-to-ceiling windows providing ample views from within. The central plaza area is furnished with tables and chairs, popular with the lunch crowd on mild days as well as three clearly defined sitting areas, protected from breezes and furnished with comfortable chairs. The roof garden has many specimen trees including contorted European beech, weeping white pines, numerous low growing crab apples, Japanese white pines and includes a specimen Japanese thread leaf maple. Many organically grown edibles are incorporated into the seasonal plantings. The FRB property has over 200 trees and a 60’ roof top greenhouse all maintained by the Bank’s horticultural staff.

 

This tour will be lead by Paul Kelly, Supervisor of Landscaping at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston since 1985 and Landscape Institute faculty member, Marie Stella.

 

Registration fee: $35

For more information contact Marie Stella, 413-625-2009 or mariestellabeaverlodge.com

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

1.5 AOLCP credits

 


8/6/14 - Plant Science Day, Hamden, CT

CT Agricultural Experiment Station

 

Lockwood Farm
890 Evergreen Avenue
Hamden, CT 06518

 

Wednesday, August 6, 2014
10:00am to 4:00pm

 

Details

Registration at door

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

8/8/14 - Deer Resistant Plants for the Home Garden, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Friday, August 8, 2014
2:00pm to 4:00pm

 

Do deer like to visit and eat your garden plants? Worried there’s no possibility for unique and artistic design in your garden because of these four-legged beasts? Then come to Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens to hear Cornell horticulture professor and avid home gardener Dr. Mark Bridgen, who scientifically studies plants that deer prefer not to eat. Mark’s entertaining lecture will show various annuals and perennials, woody plants, and grasses, and the proper conditions for growing them. Don’t despair; there are many “deer resistant” species and cultivars that offer a variety of novel colors, textures, shapes and sizes for your garden!

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

2 AOLCP credits

8/9/14 - Plants for Landscaping, Brooklyn, NY

The New York Botanical Garden
Watson Room 307
2900 Southern Boulevard
Bronx, NY 10458-5126

 

Saturdays, August 9 through August 30, 2014
10:00am to 2:30pm

 

Examine the use of plants in the landscape with an emphasis on choosing the right plant for the right place-selecting plants based on site-specific design and maintenance criteria. Learn aspects of special landscape values such as size, texture, color, and flowering and fruiting seasons. Review the trees, shrubs, groundcovers, annuals, and perennials suitable for landscaping in this region. Class goes outdoors. Please dress for the weather and wear comfortable shoes.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

8/12/14 - The Trouble with Earthworms, Framingham, MA

Co-sponsored Ecological Landscape Alliance and the New England Wild Flower Society

 

Garden in the Woods
Framingham, MA

 

Tuesday, August 12, 2014
6:00pm to 8:00pm

 

Leaf collection, hauling, and disposal are a large annual cost to property owners and a waste of resources ecologically.  Across the industry, many have adopted the practice of mulch-in-place, which eliminates the expense of hauling leaves off site and purchasing mulch. Using leaf litter as mulch builds soil organic matter, and fosters a healthy soil food web. It is a sound horticultural practice with many benefits; but, it also may be encouraging localized populations of invasive earthworms, which in turn destroy soil structure, speed up nutrient cycles, and favor invasive plant growth.

 

Part of the confusion surrounding earthworms might be explained best by Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies ecologist Peter Groffman, who states that “Earthworms are not necessarily making the soil healthy, but they are attracted to a healthy soil.” Earthworms can improve the physical condition of certain soil such as heavy clay soil or soil compacted by heavy equipment. But if good soil management is being practiced, earthworms do not have a positive effect on aeration or the movement of water or air through the soil.

 

 

Details and registration

 

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

 

2 AOLCP credits

 

8/13/14 - School and Municipal Turf/Grounds Workshop: A Minimum Risk Approach to IPM Practices, Newtown, CT.

School and Municipal Turf/Grounds Workshop: A Minimum Risk Approach to IPM Practices

 

Reed Elementary School

2 Trades Lane, Newtown, CT

 

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

7:30 am to 1:15 pm

 

The University of Connecticut and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection are presenting a school IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Workshop. Topics include, but are not limited to,  "Sensible Compost Topdressing and Overseeding Strategies with Equipment Demonstrations", "Low Maintenance Native Shrub Alternative for Invasive Plants", and Managing Ornamental Pests and Invasive Plants".

 

Details and Registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

 

 

 

 

8/19/14 - Introduction to the Native Flora of Maine, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday, August 19, 20, & 21, 2014
10:00am to 4:00pm each day

 

Interested in gardening with Maine’s native plants? First, come and meet them in their wild habitats!  During this intensive three-day course with Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens’ staff botanist, Melissa Cullina, students will learn how to recognize 50 (or more!) frequent coastal Maine plant species.  Beginning with an introduction to basic plant identification skills, terminology, and botanical names, Melissa will then lead you through the Gardens grounds and on forays around the region.  Bring a bag lunch, water, and a hand lens if you have one; and be prepared to walk on trails.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

8/20/14 - The Rain Garden at St. George's School, Middletown, RI

Sponsored by the Ecological Landscape Alliance (ELA)

 

The Beautiful and Functional Rain Garden at St. George's School

 

St. George's School
372 Purgatory Road
Middletown, RI

 

Wednesday, August 20, 2014
6:00pm to 8:00pm

 

This bio-retention rain garden was engineered and designed to capture all the rain water from the new Nathaniel P. Hill Library at St. George’s School. Completed in September 2011, St. George’s School attained L.E.E.D. Gold certification for the library and the landscaping.


This project combined a blend of engineering, science, and art.  Join us for a comprehensive look at this project and learn about the engineering involved,  plant material used in the project, the success and difficulties of having a 1600 sq. ft. rain garden, and the maintenance it requires.

 


Details and registration

 

 


AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

 

2 AOLCP credits

 

8/21/14 - What Makes a Seed Tick? Biology & Adaptations of Seeds, Whately, MA

New England Wildflower Society

 

Nasami Farm
129 North Street
Whately, MA

 

Thursday, August 21, 2014

6:30pm to 8:30pm

 

Plant seeds are little (and sometimes big) miracle packets of life; they contain everything a plant needs for a head-start. The adaptations of seeds for dispersal, dormancy, and germination are as endlessly fascinating as the incredible diversity of seed forms, and beautifully illustrate principles of evolution. A basic understanding of seed biology is useful for anyone saving or planting seeds. Join Elizabeth Farnsworth for a romp through the seed world with a colorful lecture, a seed quiz, and a chance to see many kinds of seeds up close. NOTE: This workshop complements HOR3205, Introduction to Seed Saving with Kate Stafford on August 23. Sign up for both and get a discount ($72 [Members] / $90 [Nonmembers] for both classes together).

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

2 AOLCP credits

8/23/14 - Distinguishing Invasive Plants & Native Look-Alikes in the Growing Season, Norfolk, CT

Aton Forest
270 North Colebrook Road
Norfolk, CT 06058

 

Saturday, August 23, 2014
8:30am to 5:00pm

 

Come learn to identify woody invasive plants in the field! Late winter/early spring is prime season to touch up on your skills and get a jump on these pesky plants. This time of year is ideal for management but identification can be tricky. With the help of consulting field botanist Bill Moorhead you will learn to identify invasive woody plants in both terrestrial and wetland ecosystems, and distinguish them from those native plants with which they may be confused.


A brief introductory classroom session will be followed by visits to a number of field sites. In the event of weather too severe for field work, the workshop may be changed into a lab/classroom session using fresh collected specimens.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

 

8/23/14 - Introduction to Seed Saving, Whately, MA

New England Wildflower Association

 

Nasami Farm
129 North Street
Whately, MA 01373

 

Saturday, August 23, 2014

10:00am to 2:00pm

 

Learn the basics of harvesting, processing, cleaning, and storing a variety of native plant seeds in this hands-on workshop. We’ll start with a discussion about the timing of collection, including plant identification, determining ripeness, harvesting methods, processing techniques, and proper storage to maintain seed viability. Then we’ll venture out into Nasami Farm Sanctuary for some botanizing and seed collection. Returning indoors, we’ll try our hands at cleaning and processing various types of seeds. Bring home the seeds that you clean, and learn first-hand the tremendous benefits that seed-saving brings to the willing gardener. Bring a bag lunch. NOTE:

This workshop complements BOT1067, What Makes a Seed Tick with Elizabeth Farnsworth on August 21. Sign up for both and get a discount ($72 [Members] / $90 [Nonmembers] for both classes together)

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

9/6/14 - Fall Wildflower Identification & Ecology, Norfolk, CT

Aton Forest
270 North Colebrook Road
Norfolk, CT 06058

 

Saturday, September 6, 2014
12:00pm - 3:00pm

 

Come learn to identify our local late summer/fall wildflowers! Primarily focusing on asters and goldenrods, we will explore the fields and woodlands of Aton Forest in search of these beautiful plants. This workshop will take place entirely in the field so please bring any outdoor necessities. Additionally, bringing a 10X magnification hand lens is recommended.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

3 AOLCP credits

9/8/14 - Wetland Construction: Planning & Functional Design, Bordentown, NJ

Rutgers University
Rutgers Eco Complex
1200 Florence-Columbus Rd
Bordentown, NJ 08505

 

Monday, September 8 & Tuesday, September 9, 2014
8:30am to 5:30pm

 

As state and federal wetland mitigation standards evolve away from an acre-for-acre approach to a focus on replacing wetland functions, your understanding of the wetland's "wet part" has never been more critical.

Building on your understanding of wetland functions, this course will guide you on the many factors required to plan and design a functional wetland with an emphasis on two key components that drive success: DDT (depth, duration & timing) of site hydrology and the landscape position.

Through both classroom lessons and field training at a constructed wetland complex, you’ll learn "real world" applications, including:

  • Hydrogeomorphology: The importance of landscape position and where water is coming from

  • Water Budget Calculation: Water inputs/outputs and TR-55 runoff curves

  • The Thornthwaite Method: One method for calculating evapotranspiration

  • Hydrographs: Create useable hydrographs for presentation of your wetland design

  • And much more!

Although there are several critical factors affecting a wetland's functions (from soil parent material to climate to organisms), the two key design components stressed by our instructor are: addressing the landscape position (hydrogeomorphology) of the site and understanding the DDT (depth, duration & timing) of the site's hydrology. In fact, the single biggest mistake in botched wetland construction projects is failure to understand the amount and seasonal distribution of water over time. Attend this two-day program and learn about the DDT of water and how to calculate/anticipate hydrologic patterns before your wetland is constructed!

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

9/11/14 - Horticultural Ecology, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Thursday & Friday, September 11 & 12, 2014
10:00am to 5:00pm, each day

 

This Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens class, part of the Certificate Program in Native Plants & Horticulture, is subtitled “Biological Interactions of Garden Plants and Environment.” In this class, which meets from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, September 11 and 12, you’ll delve into topics of how plants interact with their garden environment. Topics instructor Bill Cullina will cover include specific adaptations to environmental condition and interrelationships between garden plants and their surrounding biotic and abiotic influences. He’ll also discuss concepts such as competition, symbiosis, parasitism, pollination, and dispersal.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

 

 

9/18/14 - Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation, Millville, NJ

Harold N. Peek Preserve
2100 Route 47 South
Millville, NJ 08332

 

Thursday, September 18 & Friday, September 19, 2014
8:30am to 5:00pm

 

Plants are the most obvious clues to wetland boundaries. This two-day field course will teach you how to draw a wetland line by identifying a variety of upland and wetland plant species. This is a field-based course, so please dress accordingly for the outdoors.

DAY ONE: SOUTHERN COASTAL PLAIN INTERIOR / DELAWARE BAY

Southern Coastal Plain Interior

  • Upland Forest
  • Palustrine Deciduous Hardwood Forest

Delaware Bay Tidal Communities

  • Freshwater/Brackish/Saline Marshes
  • Riverine Terrace/Dunes
  • Riverine Wetland Forests

DAY TWO: OUTER COASTAL PLAIN / NORTHERN PINE BARRENS

Outer Coastal Plain

  • Upland Forest
  • Reed Grass

Northern Pine Barrens

  • Pine Plains Pitch Pine-Oak Forest

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

 

9/25/14 - Sustainable Horticultural Practices, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Thursday & Friday, September 25 & 26, 2014
10:00am to 4:00pm

 

Our landscape practices affect the balance of our ecosystem above and below the soil surface and the quality of our waters.  In this two-day intensive course at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens – from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday, September 25 and 26, you will learn how to apply ecologically safe gardening practices to existing landscapes and garden beds.  Topics covered will include different methods of composting and other eco-friendly soil amendment techniques, alternatives to pesticides and herbicides, responsible acquisition of native plant materials and other techniques that follow low-impact practices to our natural surroundings.

 

Details & registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

9/27/14 - Field Identification of Late-Season Grasses, Norfolk, CT

Aton Forest
270 North Colebrook Road
Norfolk, CT 06058

 

Saturday, September 27, & Saturday, October 4, 2014
8:30am - 5:00pm

 

This plant identification workshop focuses on identification and ecology of grasses (family Poaceae) that are detectable and identifiable in the field in late summer and early fall. The emphasis will be on the “warm-season” grasses, but we will also cover a number of other important grass species that are commonly encountered and are identifiable at this time of year. We will cover the basic features of grasses that distinguish them from other grass-like plants, the terminology used in identification manuals to describe and distinguish grass species, the characteristics of major groups, distinguishing warm-season from cool-season grasses, distinguishing invasive and other non-native species from native species, endangered grass species, wetland indicator values and other ecological affinities of various species.

 

The workshop is broken into two days:

o The first day that is largely devoted to introductory lecture and lab.

o The second day that is entirely devoted to travelling to representative habitats and their grasses at several sites.

 

Participants may register for one or both days. Grasses are a difficult group, and it is recommended that serious students who do not consider themselves advanced students register for both days. If you do not consider yourself an advanced student of grasses and can only attend one session, we recommend the first rather than the second day, as we will not be able to cover the basics again on the second day.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits for one day or for both days

 

9/28/14 - Wild Mushroom Identification & Ecology, Norfolk, CT

Aton Forest
270 North Colebrook Road
Norfolk, CT 06058

 

Saturday, September 28, 2014
Choose from: 

9:00am to 1:00pm

or 

1:00pm to 5:00pm

 

Learn to identify and differentiate safe and unsafe mushrooms and the proper conservation etiquette when collecting them.  We are likely to see numerous species that appear in early autumn.  This workshop will include some classroom instruction and much field work, followed by a wild mushroom tasting.

 

Details and registration

 

 

 

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

9/28/14 - Wild Edibles Talk & Walk, Boyleston, MA

New England Wild Flower Society

 

Tower Hill Botanic Garden
11 French Drive
Boylston, MA 01505

 

Sunday, September 28, 2014
9:00am to 12:00pm

 

From the woods to the meadows to our gardens, wild edibles are all around us. Join Dan Jaffe for a comprehensive look at the wild plants that can fill your belly. This workshop will cover finding edibles in the wild as well as growing them in your own garden. Questions concerning conservation of rare edible species will also be addressed.

 

Details & registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

3 AOLCP credits


10/3/14 - Invasive Plants: Issues, Identification, & Ecology, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Friday & Saturday, October 3 & 4, 2014
10:00am to 4:00pm

 

What’s all the fuss? Invasive plant species have been getting a lot of bad lip service from botany, ecology, horticulture, and conservation professionals alike. In this two-day course, Ted Elliman, Vegetation Management Coordinator for the New England Wild Flower Society,  will introduce you to the basic ecological problems surrounding these aggressive and tenacious plants. He’ll delve into the complicated (and sometimes political) issues surrounding invasive plant species, including the process by which a plant becomes labeled “invasive.” Finally, Ted will introduce you to some of New England’s most common invasive species through images, specimens and short local field visits.  Please bring lunch, a hand lens, water, and warm, sturdy clothes to go afield for short forays.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

10/7/14 - Invasive Plant Symposium, Storrs, CT

University of Connecticut, Student Union, 2110 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

3:00 AM to 4:30 PM

The Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group (CIPWG) will present a symposium on Tuesday, October 7, 2014 at the Student Union, University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT. The symposium will take place from 8:00 am - 4:30 pm. The theme of the symposium is: Invasive Plants 2014: Where Are We Now? People with all levels of interest and experience are invited to attend.

Details and Registration

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop.

4 AOLCP credits.

 

 

 

10/14/14 - Methodology for Delineating Wetlands, Basking Ridge, NJ

Somerset County Environmental Education Center - Lord Stirling Park
190 Lord Stirling Road
Basking Ridge, NJ 07920

 

Tuesday, October 14 through Friday, October 17, 2014
8:30am to 5:00pm

 

Learn the methods of the experts! This four-day course will introduce you to delineating wetlands using the Federal Interagency Wetland Delineation Manual, which is required for use in New Jersey. Techniques taught will also be applicable to individuals interested in using the 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual.

 

Learn how to recognize key indicators of wetlands (hydrophytic vegetation, hydric soils and other signs of wetland hydrology) and how to use them to follow the delineation methods outlined in the manual.  Immediately apply criteria learned in the classroom while performing wetland determinations during team field exercises.

 

Features of Wetland Indicators
> Vegetation: Analyze plant communities and identify dominant plants and indicators of hydrophytic vegetation
> Soils: Identify sandy and non-sandy hydric soils based on the National List of hydric soil field indicators
> Hydrology: Recognize direct and indirect indicators

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Vegetation Identification for Delineating Wetlands is required prior to attending this course.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

10/15/14 - Introduction to Wetland Identification, Basking Ridge, NJ

Somerset County Environmental Education Center - Lord Stirling Park
190 Lord Stirling Road
Basking Ridge, NJ 07920

 

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
9:00am to 5:00pm

 

 

Virtually all activities conducted in and around wetlands are regulated – from excavating underground storage tanks to soil compaction for paving a driveway or patio to pruning of overgrown vegetation – and violators are subject to hefty penalties and fines from the NJDEP.

 

Knowing if a wetland is on your property or a site on which you work is incredibly important! But how do you determine if a wetland is present?

 

Why not educate yourself? Take our class to get the basic tools you need to identify a wetland's presence. Once you make a determination, you will know if you need to go further and hire an environmental professional to evaluate the site and assist you with the permit process.

 

In this one-day combination classroom and field course, a nationally recognized wetlands expert will review the skills you need to identify freshwater wetlands and their boundaries and introduce you to wetland plant identification and soil recognition. You will learn:

  • Why wetlands are important
  • How they differ
  • What indicators are used for wetland identification
  • About the current regulations in New Jersey

You'll also find out how to access and use government maps in order to identify wetlands on your property, on lands you may be interested in purchasing or on properties on which you conduct environmental, landscaping or other site development or remediation work. You'll even get you a simple introduction to the practice of wetland delineation (the technical skill of determining a wetlands precise boundaries) --- all in one day!

 

For those interested in advancing their wetland knowledge, this course will provide the essential background material needed for further study in the step-by-step regulatory and delineation techniques covered in the Methodology for Delineating Wetlands course.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

10/16/14 - Selecting Native Woody Plants for the Maine Garden, Boothbay, ME

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
Borsage Family Education Center
132 Botanical Gardens Drive
Boothbay, ME 04537

 

Thursday & Friday, October 16 & 17, 2014
10:00am to 5:00pm

 

The use of native woody plants in a horticultural setting will be the topic of this combination classroom and in-garden course for second-year students in Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens’ Certificate Program in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture. The course, on Thursday and Friday, October 16 and 17, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. each day,  is open to all, subject to availability. 

During this, the final class in this two-year program, staff horticulturist Justin Nichols will introduce students to native trees, shrubs, and vines to use in different horticultural settings based on their habitat preferences in nature. Recommended species, cultivars and sources of materials will be covered. To see authentic examples of woody plants in natural and landscaped settings, Justin will take the class on short forays into the Gardens and locally.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

4 AOLCP credits

3/12/15 - Native Ediblels & Herbals, Framingham, MA

New England Wild Flower Society

 

Garden in the Woods
180 Hemenway Road
Framingham, MA 01701

 

Thursday, March 12, 2015
10:00am to 12:00pm

 


Whether you are interested in healthy, novel, or unusual foods—or are simply interested in applying botany to your everyday life—this class will enhance your knowledge of native edibles and herbals. From cucumber root to Oswego tea, wild edibles and medicinal plants are everywhere. In this program, students will learn how to recognize and utilize them. Dan Jaffe and Anna Fialkoff will address safe and sustainable best practices as they explore common, rare, and threatened species for forage and cultivation.

 

Details and registration

 

AOLCP attendance confirmation form to print out and bring to workshop

 

2 AOLCP credits